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Court hears legal resident case and maritime law case

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard arguments in the cases of Nielsen v. Preap and Air and Liquid Systems v. DeVries.

Sent from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, the case of Nielsen v. Preap approaches the case of three lawful residents who had been charged and convicted of crimes, served their punishment, and were released from custody. Several years later they were detained by the Department of Homeland security and held without bond because, under U.S. law, permanent residents who are convicted of a crime are to be detained and deported. The defendants argue that since they weren’t transferred into Homeland Security Custody right away such detainment is unconstitutional.

The facts of the case of Air and Liquid Systems v. DeVries are as follows. Two widows of Navy sailors claim that their husbands died due to cancer from asbestos on Navy ships. They sued multiple defendants, including the manufacturer of bare metal components that were made, processed, and shipped without any asbestos. Maritime law principles allow the manufacturer of bare metal products to be held liable for asbestos-related injuries. The Court is determining if those being sued for product liability can be held liable for products they did not make, sell or distribute under maritime law.

Sources: Supreme Court, Oyez.org
As the Lord Leads, pray with us:
  • For the Supreme Court to have wisdom as they deliberate on these cases. 
  • For judgments to be passed that are best for the nation.